Mako (I)

as Narrator in the movie Nightingale

My own actors library
Real name is Makoto Iwamatsu
Was born at 10 December 1933 in Kobe, Japan . Died at 21 July 2006, Somis, California, USA (esophageal cancer)

Born in Japan, Mako was living there with his grandparents while hisparents studied art in the United States, when Japan and the U. S. wentto war in 1941. His parents remained in the U.

S. , working for theOffice of War Information, and, at the cessation of the conflict, weregranted U. S. residency by Congress. Mako joined his parents in New Yorkand studied architecture.

He entered the U. S. Army in the early 1950sand acted in shows for military personnel, discovering a talent andlove for the theatre. He abandoned his plans to become an architect andinstead enrolled at the famed Pasadena Community Playhouse inCalifornia. Following his studies there, he appeared in many stageproductions and on television.

In 1966, he won an Academy Awardnomination as Best Supporting Actor for his first film role, as thecoolie Po-Han in The Sand Pebbles (1966) . Only occasionallysince have his roles reached the level of his talents, but he hasworked steadily in feature films ever since. He appeared on Broadway inthe leading role in 'Stephen Sondheim' 's "Pacific Overtures" andhe co-founded and served as artistic director for the highly-acclaimedEast-West Players theatre company in Los Angeles. After a long battleand illness from cancer, he passed away on the twenty first of July in2006, at the age of 72. He was survived by his wife,'Shizuko Hoshi' , who co-starred in episodes of "M*A*S*H" (1972) , as well, and his children and grand-children.

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There is some small facts about Mako (I):
  • Became a naturalized citizen in 1956.
  • Frequently cast by 'Chuck Norris' .
  • Children: daughters Sala and Mimosa.
  • Was nominated for Broadway's 1976 Tony Award as Best Actor (Musical) for "Pacific Overtures."
  • Artistic Director Emeritus of the nation's premier Asian American theatre organization, East West Players, located in the "Little Tokyo" area of Los Angeles, California, USA.
  • Passed away one day after being officially announced as the voice of "Master Splinter" in TMNT (2007) .
  • In the months before his death, he was preparing to appear with his wife in an East West production of the comedy "Motty Chon." Instead of recasting the part, the company, out of respect, canceled the production.
  • Pioneer of Asian American theater in Los Angeles.
  • Wife 'Shizuko Hoshi' is a dancer, choreographer and actress.
  • He was the East West Players' first artistic director in 1965. He also taught acting classes there to help pay the company's bills. The company's first home was a basement in a Silver Lake church secured by co-founder 'Beulah Quo' . Later, it moved to a storefront on Santa Monica Blvd. Since 1998, it has been housed in the historic Union Center for the Arts and performs in a 240 seat theater.
  • Member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (Actors Branch).
  • Received a special tribute as part of the Annual Memorial tribute at The 79th Annual Academy Awards (2007) (TV) .
  • One of six Asian actors nominated for an Academy Award in an acting category. The others are 'Haing S. Ngor' who won Best Actor in a Supporting Role for The Killing Fields (1984) , 'Miyoshi Umeki' who won for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Sayonara (1957) , 'Sessue Hayakawa' nominated for The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) , 'Ken Watanabe (I)' nominated for The Last Samurai (2003) , and 'Rinko Kikuchi' nominated for Babel (2006/I) .
  • One of eight actors of Asian descent nominated for an Academy Award in an acting category. The others are 'Miyoshi Umeki' who won Best Supporting Actress nominated for Sayonara (1957) , 'Sessue Hayakawa' nominated for The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) , 'Ben Kingsley' who won Best Actor for Gandhi (1982) , 'Haing S. Ngor' who won Best Supporting Actor for The Killing Fields (1984) , 'Pat Morita' nominated for The Karate Kid (1984) , 'Ken Watanabe (I)' nominated for The Last Samurai (2003) and 'Rinko Kikuchi' nominated for Babel (2006/I) .
  • His father Atsushi Iwamatsu who went by the pen name Taro Yashima, wrote the famous children's books Crow Boy and Umbrella.
  • His final role was as the voice of Master Splinter in TMNT (2007) . The film is dedicated to his memory.
  • Was considered for the role of Mr. Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984) , but had to back out because of his casting in Conan the Destroyer (1984) .
Also look some video clip about Mako (I):
There is the list of movies, where Mako (I) was taked part:
#postermovie/filmyearrole
1 13th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards movie 13th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards 2007 as Himself - In Memoriam
2 Conscience and the Constitution movie Conscience and the Constitution 2000 as Singer in jail
3 Judge Dee and the Monastery Murders movie Judge Dee and the Monastery Murders 1974 as Tao Gan
4 McHales Navy Joins the Air Force movie McHales Navy Joins the Air Force 1965 as Japanese Submarine Captain
5 The 1th Annual Minority Motion Picture Awards movie The 1th Annual Minority Motion Picture Awards 1993 as Himself - Winner
6 True Crime: Streets of LA movie True Crime: Streets of LA 2003 as General Han Yu Kim
7 Avatar: The Last Airbender movie Avatar: The Last Airbender 2005 as Uncle/Red Dragon
8 The Greatest American Hero movie The Greatest American Hero 1981 as Master of Flowers
9 The Secret Adventures of Jules Verne movie The Secret Adventures of Jules Verne 2000 as Kajimori
10 A Dangerous Place movie A Dangerous Place 1994 as Sensei
11 A Divided Community movie A Divided Community 2012 as Himself
12 Alegría movie Alegría 1999 as Old Momo
13 An Eye for an Eye movie An Eye for an Eye 1981 as James Chan
14 An Unremarkable Life movie An Unremarkable Life 1989 as Max Chin
15 Anatomy of a Song movie Anatomy of a Song 1976 as Himself
16 Armed Response movie Armed Response 1986 as Akira Tanaka
17 Avatar: The Last Airbender - The Legend So Far movie Avatar: The Last Airbender - The Legend So Far 2005 as Uncle Iroh
18 Balance of Power movie Balance of Power 1996 as Todo Matsumoto
19 Battle Creek Brawl movie Battle Creek Brawl 1980 as Herbert
20 Behind Enemy Lines movie Behind Enemy Lines 1986 as Capt. Vinh
21 Bulletproof Monk movie Bulletproof Monk 2003 as Mr. Kojima
22 Bus Story movie Bus Story 2003 as Father Christmas
23 Cages movie Cages 2005 as Tan
24 Chinmoku movie Chinmoku 1971 as Kichijiro
25 Chûgoku no chôjin movie Chûgoku no chôjin 1998 as Shen
26 Conan the Barbarian movie Conan the Barbarian 1982 as The Wizard/Narrator
27 Conan the Destroyer movie Conan the Destroyer 1984 as Akiro 'The Wizard'
28 Cruel Game movie Cruel Game 2002 as Straw Hat
29 Crying Freeman movie Crying Freeman 1995 as Shudo Shimazaki
30 Cultivating Charlie movie Cultivating Charlie 1994 as Katsu
31 Farewell to Manzanar movie Farewell to Manzanar 1976 as Fukimoto
32 Fools movie Fools 1970 as Psychiatrist
33 From Grasshopper to Caine: The Making of Kung Fu movie From Grasshopper to Caine: The Making of Kung Fu 2003 as Himself
34 Fukuro no shiro movie Fukuro no shiro 1999 as Toyotomi Hideyoshi
35 Genndys Scrapbook movie Genndys Scrapbook 2005 as Narrator
36 Girls of the White Orchid movie Girls of the White Orchid 1983 as Mori
37 Hawaiian Heat movie Hawaiian Heat 1984 as Major Oshira
38 Highlander III: The Sorcerer movie Highlander III: The Sorcerer 1994 as Nakano
39 Hiroshima: Out of the Ashes movie Hiroshima: Out of the Ashes 1990 as Sgt. Moritaki
40 Hito Hata: Raise the Banner movie Hito Hata: Raise the Banner 1980 as Oda
There is the list of some articles of Mako (I):
  • "The New York Times" (USA), 25 July 2006, by: Margalit Fox, "Mako, 72, Pioneering Actor for Asian-Americans, Dies"
  • "The Times" (UK), 25 July 2006, by: Anonymous, "Mako"
There is the list of some printed articles of Makoto Iwamatsu:
  • "Time" (USA), 7 August 2006, Vol. 168, Iss. 6, pg. 23, "Milestone"
There is the list of some quotes of Mako (I):
  • On the barriers that Asian-American actors have to face in Hollywood: "I go into a young film director's office these days and he says, 'Hey man, I know who you are. I grew up watching "McHale's Navy" (1962) '. And I think, 'Oh boy, here we go again'".
  • Of course we've been fighting against stereotypes from Day One at East West. That's the reason we formed: to combat that, and to show we are capable of more than just fulfilling the stereotypes -- waiter, laundryman, gardener, martial artist, villain.
  • I was a very happy child, so to speak. But, since we didn't have video games or television, and very little radio, in terms of a form of entertainment, I used to read a lot and I would draw a lot, and those two things used to occupy my time.
  • I had no idea how difficult Sondheim's music would be. All through the rehearsals, I kept flubbing. There were so many tempo changes. I could never get through the opening number without any mistakes. One day, I went up to Hal Prince and offered to leave the show. He laughed it off. He said, 'Don't be silly. That's why we have tryouts.'
  • No matter what happens, we couldn't let people say Asian-American actors can't act.
  • I came to America to become an architect. And somewhere along the line while I was still in school, I was lured into theater, and that's how I became interested in theater. My first play was something called 'A Banquet for the Moon.' It was a weird play.
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